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08/31/19 07:08 PM #1371    

 

Janis Kliphardt (Emery)

Is life not challenging enough for Texans? Why can't Americans, like citizens of other developed countries, connect the dots and do something to protect life with common gun sense safety?

On the eve of loosened gun laws taking effect in Texas, an active shooter in west Texas was driving around, randomly shooting people...

What do we expect of law enforcement (who are armed and trained)?  Mobile active shooters are even more challenging and more dangerous for them to deal with...

Somehow we choose to live in chaos / in trauma in a war zone...

We must support state leadership to confront the violence federal legislators continue to pass on.  We need not helplessly stand by.  It is urgent that public discussion about assault weapons and high capacity magazines continue and that we follow up with action.  It is time to vote for life and not for candidates beholden to the NRA.

 

Meanwhile Dorian approaches, threatening the Bahamas and Florida, and Georgia and the Carolinas,

as the Trump administration, at the height of hurricane season, diverts funding allocated for FEMA disaster relief to immigration enforcement.

 

I echo DK, and encourage all to be safe and use caution.

 


09/02/19 11:24 AM #1372    

 

Janis Kliphardt (Emery)

"Work is about a search for daily meaning as well as daily bread, for recognition as well as cash, for astonishment rather than torpor; in short, for a sort of life rather than a Monday through Friday sort of dying."  -- Studs Terkel

 

 

If feeding a child has to pass your personal "but did they earn it?" test, you have failed as a human being.

 


09/02/19 04:34 PM #1373    

 

Janis Kliphardt (Emery)

“Think about where our self-esteem as a country is when we are debating whether it is consequential for the president of the United States to be completely out of touch with reality.”

“Buttigieg is young, energetic, really smart. When he answers questions, he’s thoughtful and calm,” said a New Hampshire voter.  

Trump canceled an official trip to Poland to monitor Hurricane Dorian, and ended up celebrating Labor Day weekend out on the golf course at Trump National Golf Club in Virginia.

 

"Pity the nation whose people are sheep

       And whose shepherds mislead them

    Pity the nation whose leaders are liars

                     Whose sages are silenced

    And whose bigots haunt the airwaves

    Pity the nation that raises not its voice

                   Except to praise conquerors

                 And acclaim the bully as hero

                      And aims to rule the world

                         With force and by torture

                       Pity the nation that knows

                No other language but its own

             And no other culture but its own

  Pity the nation whose breath is money

And sleeps the sleep of the too well fed

        Pity the nation oh pity the people

          who allow their rights to erode

and their freedoms to be washed away

            My country, tears of thee 

                          Sweet land of liberty"    

 

Lawrence Ferlinghetti  (2007)  /(after Khalil Gibran)

 

 


09/03/19 02:36 PM #1374    

 

Janis Kliphardt (Emery)

The Senate can choose either to defy the American people or defy the NRA which incorrectly uses the 2nd amendment as a boogeyman.

The Trump administration suggests quick execution of mass murderers as a deterrent... (a good number of mass murderers don’t survive their rampages...

Mayor Gary Phillips of San Rafael, CA, has ordered flags on city property to be lowered to half-staff until the U.S. Senate does something to curb gun violence. 

Flags should stay at half-staff across America. 

One, because it’s only a matter of time before we’ll have to mourn the evil actions of another mass murderer (TX Gov Abbott acknowledges / accepts gun violence... says law enforcement is prepared for the next active shooter).  

Two, flying the flag at half-staff would be a visible reminder to Americans that McConnell (and the Senate) are circumventing their responsibility by deferring to Trump and have done nothing to protect America from gun violence.  The House has passed gun legislation that is sitting on McConnell’s desk.  

This is not a time for incrementalism, it’s about assault weapons and high-capacity magazines.

Good leadership flows from the bottom up.  Let’s follow Mayor Phillips’ lead to push McConnell and the Senate to take action to protect life.  

Vote for life.

 

with attribution to Jonathan Capehart,  August 9, 2019    The Washington Post

 


09/03/19 03:49 PM #1375    

Stewart Myrent

Janis, I appreciated the quote from Lawrence Ferlinghetti & was a little surprised that it was from 2007, thinking it was more recent than I would have guessed & realizing that Ferlinghetti's heyday was well before that.  (I also didn't understand the attribution to Gibran.)  But, then I realized that 2007 is now more than 10 years ago.  My, how time flies!  I'm sure you all realize that the gala 55th Reunion is now less than 2 weeks away, & I'm betting & hoping that all who keep up with this page, are planning on attending.  See you all soon!


09/03/19 05:52 PM #1376    

 

Vic Stroetzel

 .We're here in Hendersoville, NC watching the weather channel of Dorian's path. We are in western NC, and will probably not get a drop. My concerns are for the Wilmington area on the east coast, that is still reeling from Florence last year. Tryon's equestrian center, which is 'down the mountain', on the border with SC, has taken in 68 horses from Florida, and said they have reached out to the coastal horse owners, letting them know what space they have if they choose to bring them west to safety. My heart goes out to the Wilmington Community.

Obviously. if someone needs to get away from the coast, contact me, and we'll see what we can do.

 

Vic
 


09/04/19 12:23 PM #1377    

 

Janis Kliphardt (Emery)

Thanks, Vic.  Dorian devastated the Bahamas - it’s slow and sheer unpredictability is causing great fatigue on the eastern seaboard.  It is critical to prepare for the worst.  Dorian continues to be a dangerous storm.  

Beware tornadoes.

 

Timothy Noah, a sexagenarian and mindful of the scourge of ageism, has an article in PoliticoMagazine / September 3, 2019.  Here are large chunks from his article...

America, the Gerontocracy  Our leaders, our electorate and our hallowed system of government itself are aging.  And it shows.

“Hate crime is rising, the Arctic is burning, and the Dow is bobbling like a cork on an angry sea.  If the nation seems intolerant, reckless and more than a little cranky, perhaps that’s because the American republic is showing its age.  Somewhere along the way, a once-new nation conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal (not men and women; that came later) became a wheezy gerontocracy.  Our leaders, our electorate and our hallowed system of government itself are extremely old.  

“To affirm that America must work harder to include the elderly within its vibrant multicultural quilt is not to say it must be governed almost entirely by duffers.  The cause of greater diversity would be advanced, not thwarted, if a few more younger people penetrated the ranks of American voters and American political leaders.  

“Remember laughing at the Soviet Politburo?  The U.S. doesn’t have a Politburo, but the median age of Trump, Pelosi, McConnell, and the three leading 2020 Democratic candidates is ... uh ... 77.  And it doesn’t stop there.  The average age in Congress declined through the 1970s but it’s mostly increased since the 1980s.  When the current session of Congress began in January, the average ages of House and Senate members were 58 and 63, respectively - slightly older than the previous Congress which was already among the oldest in history.  

“The entire U.S. workforce is getting older, thanks to the aging of the Baby Boom—that giant Hula-Hoop-shaking cohort born during the prosperous post-World War II years from 1946 to 1964.  But the federal bureaucracy is even older.  

“The two Democratic presidential candidates proposing the most dramatic departure from the status quo are Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren.  Still, there’s something to be said for youth and vigor.  

“We think of ourselves as a young country, and in many respects we are.  No nation in the world has a written Constitution older than ours.  And it shows.  

“The list of the Constitution’s anachronisms and ambiguities is long.  None of this would matter much if our government were more amenable to reconsidering first principles, but that’s getting harder.  The Constitution can be amended, and it has been, 27 times.  But growing political polarization in recent years has made that difficult.  Only two constitutional amendments were ratified during the past half-century.  Congress passes fewer substantive laws today than it did 30 years ago.  Increased use of the filibuster (which is not mentioned in the Constitution, but has been around almost as long) almost certainly played a role, and a fed-up Senate has during the past decade started phasing out its use.

“And Congress has acquired a problem James Madison never anticipated: a reluctance to compete with the other two branches of government in the exercise of power.  Political scientist, Yuval Levin concluded in a provocative June 2018 essay in Commentary that partisanship has displaced ambition to legislate.  Senators and representatives now “see themselves as players in a larger political ecosystem the point of which is not legislating or governing but rather engaging in a kind of performative outrage for a partisan audience.”  Though Levin didn’t put it this way, Timothy Noah believes he seems to be suggesting that Congress had grown decadent.  

“A more modest theory of governmental decadence was set forward by Rauch in his 1994 book Demosclerosis.  The idea was that democracy had developed arteriosclerosis because the accumulating power of interest groups over time was choking it like a weed.  Demosclerosis differs from gridlock, Rauch argued, because gridlock implies that nothing gets done. Rather, Rauch wrote, in a demosclerotic government, plenty gets done, but the government’s ability to solve problems is compromised because it can’t easily reassign a finite set of resources.  Old allocations must continue, and therefore new allocations can’t be experimented with.  Think of it, Rauch says, like leaving a bicycle in the rain.  The bicycle may be perfectly fine, but if you leave it outside long enough rust will corrode it.  All things considered, Rauch says, the Constitution is in excellent working condition.  But it’s machinery has been left out too long in the rain.  

“Bringing a bicycle in from the rain should be within the ability of America’s somewhat doddering polity.  Our gerontocracy is a bit rheumatic, but it isn’t hopeless.  Still, the task will likely be easier and go much faster if a few more young hands (and minds are allowed to) pitch in."

 

It's time to loosen our grip on the torch. janis

 

 


09/04/19 01:37 PM #1378    

Stewart Myrent

Janis, I want to tell you that I was stunned & awestruck by Timothy Noah's article in "Politico" about "America, the Gerontocracy".  Thank you so much for passing that on, as I hadn't really thought about the aging of our democracy - I'm pretty sure I had thought that America is a really young country.  And it is - compared to the countries of Europe.  I thought the part about the lack of changes to the U.S. Constitution in the past 50+ years, was fairly eye-opening.  I am over halfway through a new release I picked up a few days ago, a biography of Phineas T. Barnum.  I had thought that Barnum was popular during the 1880-90's, but it turns out that he started his showmanship career in the early 1840's.


09/04/19 09:11 PM #1379    

 

Janis Kliphardt (Emery)

“Kindness is the language which the deaf can hear and the blind can see.”  -- Mark Twain

With love and support for all who are suffering the ravages of Hurricane Dorian.

Beware tornadoes and storm surges and flash flooding.

Stay alert and be safe:

“Hide from the wind; run from the water.”

 


09/06/19 12:50 PM #1380    

 

Janis Kliphardt (Emery)

Dorian’s staying too long -

there have been up to 2 dozen tornadoes related to the slow-moving hurricane... 

Dorian’s impact in the U.S. will soon (hopefully) be a bad memory, 

but the destruction in the Bahamas is a humanitarian disaster.

How deep must one dig to pick up and start from scratch?

The Bahamas, like Puerto Rico, has all but drowned and is in desperate need of help.

There’s no hiding from water.

 


09/06/19 01:48 PM #1381    

Stewart Myrent

Just finished the biography "Barnum: An American Life", by Robert Wilson.  Barnum was widely known because of 4 "humbugs": (1) presenting Joice Heth, as a 161-year old black woman, who was supposedly George Washington's nursemaid (if you believe she was 161-yrs. old, you'll believe she could have been Washington's nursemaid), (2) General Tom Thumb (born Charley Stratton), who was really a 6-yr. old dwarf, (3) Jenny Lind, the "Swedish Nightingale", who was a very talented opera singer, and (4) Jumbo, the elephant, who weighed seven tons & reached nearly 12' at the highest part of his back (& coincidentally killed by a freight train).  In the latter stages of Barnum's life, he was well-known as a promoter & gave many speeches for causes, such as abolition, temperance & teetotalling, & the importance of living a religiously-based life.  One section of Chapter 13, "A Ruined Man", caught my attention, "...a man whom Emerson and members of the intelligentsia in the U.S. and Britain could find both sneer-worthy and also alarming.  That the middle classes responded so readily to what Barnum offered - to his hoaxes and publicity stunts but also to the way he challenged them to see with their own eyes and rely on their own judgment - was partly what defenders of tradition, the perquisites of class, and culture itself, as they saw it, were railing against when they attacked Barnum.  Yes, his smugness was irritating, but it was his role as a leader of the mob assaulting the citadels of culture - for example, by undermining serious theater with his moralistic melodramas - that made him a palpable threat."  Hmmm!  Sound familiar?


09/06/19 08:10 PM #1382    

 

Janis Kliphardt (Emery)

Way too familiar.  The Trump campaign is cashing in on the Alabama 'Sharpie' controversy - selling Trump brand 'Fine Point Markers' for $15 to 'Set the Record Straight'.

Remember Harold Hill on his way to River City, Iowa and the patter song of the salesmen on the train?  "...you gotta know the territory, you gotta know the territory..." 

Marian the Librarian softened and fell for the Music Man.

With the fanfare of a popular musical comedy, performed at Niles West, Iowan Meredith Willson glamorized the con man.  "(We) Got Trouble" -

Trump "knows the territory." 

 


09/07/19 12:58 PM #1383    

 

Janis Kliphardt (Emery)

With no reason to believe the U.S. Congress will do anything this fall to address gun safety, America’s largest retailers are stepping up to take action on common gun sense.  

Walmart’s CEO has sent a series of letters to congressional leaders and Trump calling for congressional debate about reauthorizing the assault-weapons ban and to finance research on gun violence.  

 

Addressing America’s gun violence epidemic will require leaders from across American society to be part of the solution - we have to shatter the guns on demand culture.

 

Yesterday in Texas, the GOP Lt.Governor, who prides himself in being a “solid NRA guy” said, “not expanding the background check to eliminate stranger-to-stranger sales without a background check makes no sense.” 

The Lt. Governor, who has previously received an A+ grade from the NRA for his stance on Second Amendment rights, said he is “willing to take an arrow” (not a bullet) to tighten background checks and endorsed expanding Texas' background checks to include private stranger-to-stranger gun sales.

 


09/09/19 02:48 PM #1384    

 

Janis Kliphardt (Emery)

One Night Democratic Debate this Thursday:

Ten (of the 20 remaining) Democratic presidential candidates qualified for the September Democratic Debate this Thursday, 9/12 - Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders, Kamala Harris, Pete Buttigieg, Andrew Yang, Cory Booker, Beto O'Rourke, Amy Klobuchar, and Julián Castro will all be together on one stage in Houston, Texas, on Thursday.

September's one-night debate will be the first time the top polling candidates will face off on a single debate stage.  Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren will be standing next to one another at center stage podiums.

ABC in partnership with Univision will host the three-hour debate from 8 to 11 p.m. ET this Thursday -

each candidate will have one minute and 15 seconds for direct response to questions from the moderators and 45 seconds to respond to follow-up questions and rebuttals.  Candidates will give opening statements, but no closing statements.

 

As for winnowing the field: Two steps forward, one step back.  October will be a two night-debate - Tom Steyer (who had already met the donor requirements, made the polling threshold yesterday when he posted at 2% in his 4th qualifying poll) will participate in the two-night October debate with the ten candidates who met the deadline for the debate stage in September...

Eleven candidates qualifying for the October debate automatically made for a two-night debate.  (The qualification criteria are the same for both the September and October debates, but the October debate has its own separate qualifying deadline - there’s time for more candidates to qualify for the October two-night debate.) 

Tulsi Gabbard and Marianne Williamson have both met the donor requirements, but have not met the polling threshold to qualify.

Michael Bennet, Steve Bullock, Bill de Blasio, John Delaney, Wayne Messam, Tim Ryan, Joe Sestak have a way to go to meet both donor requirements and polling threshold.  

Seven candidates have dropped out of the presidential race: Kirsten Gillibrand, Jay Inslee, Seth Moulton, John Hickenlooper, Eric Swalwell, Richard Ojeda, Mike Gravel.

 


09/09/19 09:25 PM #1385    

 

Janis Kliphardt (Emery)

Today - another avalanche of public corruption...

alarming / frightening incidents come to light...

Could our founding fathers have anticipated

how cavalier one president could be?

how much corruption one U.S. President could perpetrate?

Disregard for truth creates a culture that puts our country at risk -

the wheels of government are corrupted.

The legislative calendar is counting down...

The House Judiciary Committee will vote Thursday on a resolution to define the parameters of its impeachment investigation into Donald Trump.

 

Day 963 of the Trump presidency.

 


09/10/19 01:38 PM #1386    

 

Janis Kliphardt (Emery)

Gun safety is of growing concern to vast majorities of Americans—to Democrats and Republicans, men and women alike.  

Most significantly, gun violence is starting to scare people: according to a survey by the American Psychological Association, a third of Americans report that fear of a mass shooting stops them from going to certain public places; sixty percent of Americans say they’re worried about a mass shooting in their community. 

Republican voters are open to the kinds of programs once considered dead on arrival in political circles, including banning sales of military-style assault weapons and creating a mandatory federal buyback program for those weapons.

Republicans elected to office seem unable to evolve on the issue:

Has Mitch McConnell no shame?  Americans are being slaughtered.  Flanked by Republican Senators, McConnell stands in front of the American people and tells us that until Trump tailors and endorses a proposal, he will not engage the Senate in “theatrics”.  McConnell is misrepresenting the Constitution - he speaks as if we do not know that the powers of our federal government are vested in three separate but equal branches and that the Constitution clearly makes Congress the most powerful of the three branches.  

People are dying and McConnell (and the Republican Senators) wave off their responsibility in deference to Trump.  

Gun safety advocates are pushing for the Senate to take responsibility and get to work - there is legislation passed by the House sitting on Mitch McConnell’s desk...

It’s on us!  We must push our legislators, and simultaneously keep our sights firmly on the 2020 election.  Sadly, no one expects any real movement in D.C. until at least 2021.  

Vote for life.

 


09/11/19 02:08 PM #1387    

Stewart Myrent

Forgot to mention this the other day, but I just saw an article by Peter Wehner in "The Atlantic", titled "Trump Is Not Well".  Too much to recount here, but it's a fascinating & well-written observation about Trump's shortcomings as president, AND this guy is a life-long Republican.  Just finished a new release I picked up a few days ago, called "The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper", by Hallie Rubenhold.  At the beginning of the book, there is an epigraph from Audre Lorde, an American writer, civil rights activist & feminist, "I write for those women who do not speak, for those who do not have a voice because they were so terrified, because we are taught to respect fear more than ourselves.  We've been taught that silence would save us, but it won't."  I thought these quotes from Part 1: Polly - "An Irregular Life", were very interesting: "The poor were judged to be lazy and immoral paupers who refused to do honest work and bred bastards and enormous families while 'living off handouts!'  And also, "...where the character was compromised, sexual immorality was also assumed.  Regardless of whether or not she could support herself with laundry work or charring (housekeeping), the concept of a woman of childbearing age living and enjoying a single life was anathema to the Victorian era, regardless of one's class.  Without a man, a woman had no credibility, no protection against the schemes and violence of other men, and no purpose in life.  Similarly, a man without a woman had no one to tend to his practical and sexual needs."  The major point of this book is that, at that time, the police & authorities characterized all 5 of Jack's victims as "prostitutes", because it was convenient to do so.  However, concerning the first 4 victims, there is no evidence that ANY were prostitutes, with the exception of the 5th victim.  Interestingly, the first 4 victims were all in their mid-forties, but the 5th victim was the only one in her mid-twenties.  The one thing they all had in common was that they were all major alcoholics.  Easy pickins' for Jack.  But, there were tons of alcoholics in London, because the water from the Thames was not considered safe to drink, so a mild type of beer was sold, which was safer to drink than the water from the Thames (due to the fermentaion process (?)  If you were in the working classes in Victorian England, your life was pretty much pure shit.  Especially, if you were a woman.  Just picked up another new release, "The Pioneers: The Heroic Story of the Settlers Who Brought the American Ideal West", by David McCullough.  Not sure why I've been attracted to these books about when life was really dificult, on a daily basis, because I'm pretty sure I never would have made it in those days.  I had previously read a biography of John & Abigail Adams, by McCullough, & though it was one of the best books I had ever read.  See you all in less than a week.


09/11/19 02:08 PM #1388    

Stewart Myrent

Forgot to mention this the other day, but I just saw an article by Peter Wehner in "The Atlantic", titled "Trump Is Not Well".  Too much to recount here, but it's a fascinating & well-written observation about Trump's shortcomings as president, AND this guy is a life-long Republican.  Just finished a new release I picked up a few days ago, called "The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper", by Hallie Rubenhold.  At the beginning of the book, there is an epigraph from Audre Lorde, an American writer, civil rights activist & feminist, "I write for those women who do not speak, for those who do not have a voice because they were so terrified, because we are taught to respect fear more than ourselves.  We've been taught that silence would save us, but it won't."  I thought these quotes from Part 1: Polly - "An Irregular Life", were very interesting: "The poor were judged to be lazy and immoral paupers who refused to do honest work and bred bastards and enormous families while 'living off handouts!'  And also, "...where the character was compromised, sexual immorality was also assumed.  Regardless of whether or not she could support herself with laundry work or charring (housekeeping), the concept of a woman of childbearing age living and enjoying a single life was anathema to the Victorian era, regardless of one's class.  Without a man, a woman had no credibility, no protection against the schemes and violence of other men, and no purpose in life.  Similarly, a man without a woman had no one to tend to his practical and sexual needs."  The major point of this book is that, at that time, the police & authorities characterized all 5 of Jack's victims as "prostitutes", because it was convenient to do so.  However, concerning the first 4 victims, there is no evidence that ANY were prostitutes, with the exception of the 5th victim.  Interestingly, the first 4 victims were all in their mid-forties, but the 5th victim was the only one in her mid-twenties.  The one thing they all had in common was that they were all major alcoholics.  Easy pickins' for Jack.  But, there were tons of alcoholics in London, because the water from the Thames was not considered safe to drink, so a mild type of beer was sold, which was safer to drink than the water from the Thames (due to the fermentaion process (?)  If you were in the working classes in Victorian England, your life was pretty much pure shit.  Especially, if you were a woman.  Just picked up another new release, "The Pioneers: The Heroic Story of the Settlers Who Brought the American Ideal West", by David McCullough.  Not sure why I've been attracted to these books about when life was really dificult, on a daily basis, because I'm pretty sure I never would have made it in those days.  I had previously read a biography of John & Abigail Adams, by McCullough, & thought it was one of the best books I had ever read.  See you all in less than a week.


09/11/19 03:38 PM #1389    

 

Janis Kliphardt (Emery)

In Trump's world (Ben Sasse’s world) -

"Nothing's a fact 'til Donald Trump says it's a fact."

"We all must submit to Trump's will."  

I too worry -

“The world is shaped by Donald Trump’s impulses.”

Our country’s future in in jeopardy -

the future of our country is at stake.

"In this age, in this country, public sentiment is everything.  With it, nothing can fail; against it, nothing can succeed.”  -- Abraham Lincoln

 


09/11/19 09:37 PM #1390    

 

Donald Henry Kuehn

YSome people review new books, some lament the political world of #45, some play in golf tournaments.

But before I get to that, I took a picture of my golf ball that stopped about 5 inches from the hole, then I took a Sharpie and drew a circle around the ball and the hole. Does that count as a hole-in-one? Just askin’.

Now, the news: I am in a hotel in Dayton, OH on my way home from two tournaments. I played in the Porter Cup in Niagara Falls last week. Putted poorly, finished 3rd. It was disappointing because I was defending the title I won last year.

Then I went to beautiful (HA!) Johnstown, PA for the Sunnehanna Senior. If you’ve been to the flood museum, the 9/11 memorial and ridden the funicular to the top of the mountain you have done the “Top Ten Things to Do in Johnstown, Pennsylvania”.

This is a tournament I have played in two other years and never was able to solve the complex greens and quirky design. I wasn’t sure I was going to return. It is also one of the oldest stroke play (not match play) amateur events in America (although the senior version is only about 15 years old).

It was a totally different week on the greens. I putted well and had rounds of 68, 69 and 70 to win the title (over 70 years) by eight strokes. It was good to have 3 rounds under par (and under my age!) in a tournament, especially since in today’s round I was so far ahead that I could just play to the center of greens and not worry too much about making a lot of birdies. It was a matter of not making the big mistake and trying to make pars.

I still have about 11 events left on my calendar this year, but the only “national” tournament will come in November near St. George, Utah.

I hope everyone has a great time at the mini-reunion this weekend. Someone give me a review of the famous Hackney burger on dark rye (I assume it is still the feature item on the menu).  

DK


09/12/19 10:38 AM #1391    

 

Janis Kliphardt (Emery)

DK, you are seeing the USA (crisscrossing the country with presidential candidates).  Are you driving a Chevrolet?

It is wonderful to hear the scenic itinerary of your golf tournaments.

Mayor Nan Whaley undoubtedly welcomed you to Dayton...

Your prowess and skill, and flexibiliy and equilibrium continue to amaze -

about eleven more events on your calendar this year including a "national" near St. George, Utah.

You are up on Sharpie-gate and meeting the challenge of courses that have vexed you in the past. Bravo!

You have also mastered the language to communicate across political lines, a good will ambassador for Niles West.

I too will miss our classmates this weekend and send good wishes to all who gather on Monday for the famous Hackney burger on dark rye and the onion loaf "broken open". Cheers!

(Stewart, please check the message center, I sent messages to you there.)

 


09/12/19 11:09 AM #1392    

 

Janis Kliphardt (Emery)

The good news! Christian Yelich does NOT need surgery.  

No matter your favorite team, it is sheer joy to watch Christian play.  

Meanwhile, Trent Grisham and the Brewers are holding down the fort.

 


09/12/19 10:17 PM #1393    

 

Janis Kliphardt (Emery)

  God bless the Parkland kids,

  Marching for Our Lives.

 

  Vote for Life.

 

  Moms Demand Action.

 

“The AR-15 and the AK-47 were designed to kill people on a battlefield -

"when the high-impact, high-velocity round hits your body, it shreds everything inside of your body, because it was designed to do that.  

"And in Odessa, I met the mother of a fifteen-year-old girl who was shot by an AR-15, and that mother watched her bleed to death, over the course of an hour because so many other people were shot by that AR-15 in Odessa, in Midland, there weren’t enough ambulances to get to them in time.”   -- Beto O’Rourke 

 

  Despair must not be the last word.

  People are in the streets chanting, "Do something!"

  It’s on us. Power is with the people.

  The politics of weapons of war is moving rapidly.

  Arms are for hugging.

  Vote for Life.

 


09/17/19 10:30 AM #1394    

 

Larry Metnick

I thought I would provide a very brief recap of the 9-16-2019 mini reunion held at Hackney’s. Approximately 40 people were in attendance. Both East and West people were there. As usual, it was like one night in Disneyland. I was able to “go back in time” and be with high school classmates, some I knew, some who knew me and some who I met for the first time. There was an instant connection to all who I spoke with. One came from Portland Oregon just for the occasion. Thanks to Scott Mermel for his organizing efforts. Now it is back to my normal routine, but the good feelings from last night still linger.


09/18/19 05:16 PM #1395    

 

Janis Kliphardt (Emery)

It’s back-to-school...

“The Sandy Hook Promise, a nonprofit founded by families of those whose loved ones were killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in 2012, released a back-to-school ad that shows the horrifying reality of school shootings.

“The Public Service Announcement starts with students sharing the new items they’re excited to be using during the upcoming school year—like backpacks and art supplies.

“But there’s a twist.

“About halfway through, it becomes apparent that the students are using “back-to-school essentials” for self-defense in a school shooting.  

“One student uses a sock as a tourniquet to stop a classmate from bleeding, another used her new phone to text her mom that she loves her while she hides in a bathroom.”

-- Take the time to watch the full video -- listen to the kids... their message is sobering.

With school shootings an increasingly common fear, some students and teachers have started writing their own wills.

American school children begin doing active shooter drills at three years of age.  

No other developed country shows so little concern about the well-being of their children.  We have to do more than talk about our concern, we have to be about our concern.

Vote for Life.

 


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